Question: Why Do Prescription Drugs Have 2 Names?

They’re names for drugs.

They’re the names for the active ingredients.

You may have noticed that every brand-name drug has a second name — for instance, Prozac® (fluoxetine).

That second name, fluoxetine, is a name for the active ingredient, which is the same whatever the brand or generic form.

Why do medications have 2 names?

Every medication enters the market with two names. The first name is its generic (or chemical) name. The second name is its brand name, usually something catchy and chosen by the manufacturer who has the patent on the medication. This allows generic companies to price their medications much lower.

Why a drug usually has different names?

GENERIC AND BRAND NAMES

Every drug has an approved generic or medical name, decided on by an expert committee. Many drugs are also known by a brand or trade name chosen by the pharmaceutical company making and selling that drug as a medicine.

How are prescription drugs named?

Drugs, in other words, have at least three names. And coming up with these names, both a chemical name and its commercial brand, requires a drug name decoder. For drugs, the key is chemistry. Drug makers propose generic names according to their compound’s chemical makeup.

How many trade names can a drug have?

Trade names almost always have one accepted pronunciation, because the sponsoring company who coined the name has an intended pronunciation for it. However, it is also common for a nonproprietary drug name to have two pronunciation variants, or sometimes three.

Is Ibuprofen a generic name?

The drug company that makes a medicine chooses a brand name that is usually easier to say and remember than the generic name. For example, Motrin is a brand name for a medicine used to treat pain. Its generic name is ibuprofen. So today, Motrin and Advil are just a few of the many brand names for ibuprofen.

What is generic name?

Generic name, drug: The term “generic name” has several meanings as regards drugs: A term referring to the chemical makeup of a drug rather than to the advertised brand name under which the drug is sold. A term referring to any drug marketed under its chemical name without advertising.