Question: Does Slow Kill Heartworm Treatment Work?

According to the American Heartworm Society: The slow kill treatment is less effective than the adulticide treatment recommended by the AHS and may not eliminate all the worms—even after 18 months or more of treatment.

What is slow kill heartworm treatment?

Treatment with melarsomine (Immiticide®), which kills the adult heartworms, is one method of treatment. Monthly administration of ivermectin-based heartworm preventive medications alone is sometimes used as a second method of heartworm treatment. This is referred to as the “slow kill” or “soft kill” method.

How long does it take Melarsomine to kill heartworms?

How are the heartworms killed? The first melarsomine injection is given after your pet has had a minimum of two months of heartworm prevention, and has taken Doxycycline for 30 days.

How often do dogs die during heartworm treatment?

A: Studies have shown that if you use ivermectin, the common preventative, on a monthly basis in a dog with heartworm disease, after about two years you’ll kill off most of the dog’s young heartworms. The problem is, in the meantime, all of those heartworms are doing permanent damage to the heart and blood vessels.

How successful is heartworm treatment?

Treatment with anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, cage rest, supportive care, and intravenous fluids is usually effective in these cases. Treatment to kill microfilaria. In addition to the drug that is used to kill adult heartworms, your dog will receive a drug to kill the baby heartworms or microfilariae.