Quick Answer: Does Birth Control Increase Risk Of Cancer?

Does the pill increase risk of cancer?

Taking the combined pill increases the risk of breast and cervical cancer.

Those currently taking the combined pill have a slightly increased risk of breast cancer.

Taking the combined pill for only a short time may not have any effect on risk of cervical cancer.

Does birth control increase breast cancer risk?

Current or recent use of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) slightly increases the risk of breast cancer [11,37-40]. Studies show while women are taking birth control pills (and shortly after), their breast cancer risk is 20-30 percent higher than women who have never used the pill [37,39-40].

Do birth control pills cause cervical cancer?

Nov. 8, 2007 — Women who use oral contraceptives have an increased risk of developing cervical cancer, but the risk drops quickly once the pill is stopped. Taking oral contraceptives for five or more years was associated with a doubling of cervical cancer risk in the newly published study.

Is birth control bad for you long term?

If you’ve been taking birth control pills for some time and have had no side effects, it’s likely that you can continue using them for as long as you need them and as long as your healthcare provider deems it’s still a safe choice. For most healthy people, birth control pills are safe for long-term use.

Who is at greatest risk for breast cancer?

Being a woman and getting older are the main risk factors for breast cancer. Studies have shown that your risk for breast cancer is due to a combination of factors. The main factors that influence your risk include being a woman and getting older. Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older.

How does birth control prevent cancer?

In a new study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers explore how oral contraceptives, which affect women’s hormone levels to prevent pregnancy, affect cancer risk. They found that women taking the pill lowered their risks of ovarian and endometrial cancer—a known benefit of the pill.

What is the safest birth control method?

The kinds of birth control that work the best to prevent pregnancy are the implant and IUDs — they’re also the most convenient to use, and the most foolproof. Other birth control methods, like the pill, ring, patch, and shot, are also really good at preventing pregnancy if you use them perfectly.

Is birth control bad for your health?

Even though birth control pills are very safe, using the combination pill can slightly increase your risk of health problems. Complications are rare, but they can be serious. These include heart attack, stroke, blood clots, and liver tumors. In very rare cases, they can lead to death.

Why does OCP cause cervical cancer?

In addition, oral contraceptives might increase the risk of cervical cancer by changing the susceptibility of cervical cells to persistent infection with high-risk HPV types (the cause of virtually all cervical cancers).

Is it OK to be on birth control for years?

Is it safe to use birth control indefinitely? Most people can safely use hormonal contraceptives for many years, provided their doctor has recommended it. However, many long-term birth control methods contain hormones. This can cause problems depending on a person’s medical history, age, and overall health.

At what age should you stop birth control?

All women can stop using contraception at the age of 55 as getting pregnant naturally after this is very rare. For safety reasons, women are advised to stop the combined pill at 50 and change to a progestogen-only pill or other method of contraception.

What are the disadvantages of birth control pills?

You may also notice spotting or bleeding between periods (this is more common with progestin-only pills), sore breasts, nausea, or headaches. These side effects usually go away after 2 or 3 months, and they don’t happen to everyone who takes the pill. Birth control shouldn’t make you feel sick or uncomfortable.